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Marsh Award for the Encouragement of Medallic Art

This Award, run in partnership with the British Art Medal Society (BAMS), recognises an individual or organisation that has made a significant contribution to the understanding, appreciation and encouragement of the art of the medal.

Nominees will be either living individuals or organisations. They may be involved in the promotion of the medal as artists, scholars, collectors, dealers, sponsors, teachers, or in some other capacity. Organisations may be public or private and will have demonstrated a longstanding commitment to fostering the medal.

All nominations are judged by the BAMS council.

Lucy Willow 2018

Lucy is the Lead Teacher in the Department of Sculpture at Falmouth University’s School of Art, working with students to produce medals for the past six years. She first became involved with BAMS as a student when she took part in the Student Medal Project in 2001 and her medal, Dreams of a Dying Moth, was produced by BAMS in 2002.

Lucy’s enthusiasm and dedication to the art of the medal has strengthened her Department’s participation and the results have been positive, with prize winners among her students almost every year, several of whom have become New Medallists. As a teacher who struggles to find time and finances to do her own work, the Award will mean a great deal to her.

Lucy’s passion for medals is clear to see and is passed on to her students. She makes the Medal Project central to the core curriculum in the Department and one of her students is making medals his final degree project. Along with the Head of Technical Services, Lucy plans to take medal making across the different courses in the Department, in order to make it more accessible as an option for students and keep the foundry flourishing.

Previous Winners

Kate Harrison

During her time as Head of Jewellery at Loughborough School of Art and Design she involved her students in the RBS medal project.  When BAMS started its own project Kate was very keen that her students participate, and they did very well while she was in charge and, in fact, have continued to produce strong medals (some winners, and at least one a BAMS medal).  But Kate always did more.  In 1998 she organised a one-day symposium specifically on the medal, inviting colleges, speakers and makers to come to Loughborough and discuss medal making.  A small brochure was produced.  She organised the BAMS Conference in Loughborough and the exhibition.  Kate also helped with applications to the RA in the early years.  She did a thorough job of indexing The Medal journal, which was much needed and appreciated; and she was on the Council for some years.  One further thing: Kate contributed to bringing about the reinstatement of the medal as a category in the Goldsmiths’ Company craft competition, a very useful and important public arena for medals.  Of course, as well, Kate makes very beautiful medals, including one for BAMS.  She is someone to go to if a comment is needed for publication, or for advice.

David Reid

David is an artist, founder and educator who has supported the British Art Medal Society for a number of years. He pioneered small-scale bronze casting and has run a number of bronze-casting courses which have given artists around the world enough knowledge and experience to set up their own home foundries.

In 1984, David set up the Red Bronze Studio and he also had some input into the setting up of the Bronze Age Foundry in London in 1989, which has gone on to become one of the leading art foundries in Britain and provides expert services to artists wishing to cast their original sculptures in bronze and aluminium. He also ran the foundry at the Central Saint Martin’s School of Art, a world leading centre for art and design and part of the University of the Arts London.

David’s longstanding commitment to art medals, the innovations he has made in bronze casting and his generous support to the British Art Medal Society has meant that it can fulfil its objectives of developing and supporting the art of the medal in the United Kingdom and the rest of the world.

Arnold Nieuwendam

Arnold is a Dutch painter who has been a regular attender at BAMS Conferences for many years and his photographic records of the conferences have frequently been used in The Medal.  Over the last 20 years, he has published hundreds of articles on medals, a number of which have been used in BAMS publications. His publications are mainly based on contemporary medals and medal-events in Dutch and Belgian numismatic and medallic periodicals.

Arnold also runs a medal website on a voluntary basis. His contributions are impressive as he receives no payment for any of his articles or his website work. He is an archetypal “unsung hero” who has done so much to promote the art of medals.

Andrew Griffiths

Andrew is Head of Sculpture at Carmarthen School of Art, which has been involved in the BAMS Student Medal Project since 1999, which promotes the art of making medals throughout art colleges in the United Kingdom. He has shown immense support to the students who wish to learn more about casting, running workshops, casting medals on the beach and leading in workshops on iron casting.

Andrew studied at the Central School of Art, London. After graduating he worked for seven years at the A&A Sculpture Casting Foundry, London, before moving to South Wales and becoming a lecturer. Andrew’s long-standing commitment and enthusiasm for art medals, his work to engage young people in the medallic arts and his generous support to BAMS is extraordinary.

Howard and Frances Simmons

Howard and Frances Simmons set up Simmons Gallery in 1982 to provide a general service to collectors of coins. They buy and sell coins from around the world and have specialist knowledge of this field in South East Asia, China, Japan, the Indian sub-continent and Latin America.

Howard and Frances have shown a great passion for what they do throughout their 30 year career. Howard has been collecting coins since he was a toddler, and could be found rummaging for coins in antique shops throughout his teenage and student years. When he and Frances were married, this interest only strengthened. They both continue to be inspired by numismatics, and shows great dedication to their work in this field.

Professor Bogomil Nikolov

Professor Bogomil Nikolov is a Bulgarian artist who was for many years a lone voice promoting medallic art in his country. A professor at the National Academy of Arts in Sofia, he has introduced generations of students to medallic art. Unflaggingly energetic, he organises several national and international medallic workshops every year.

Thomas Fattorini Ltd

Thomas Fattorini Ltd have a longstanding record as a manufacturer of high-quality medals and have been unflagging in their encouragement of medallic art over many years. The company have also been extremely generous in their support of the British Art Medal Society, helping the organisation to fulfil their objectives of developing and supporting the art of the medal in the United Kingdom and elsewhere.